Lorelei Lee

Review: The Feminist Porn Book

Review: The Feminist Porn Book

Wedged between my consumption of Fast Food Nation and We Need to Talk About Kevin, I inhaled The Feminist Porn Book. I wrote in the margins and bent the pages and even took it in the bath. When I was a stupid teen, I inherited a waterlogged copy of Marilyn Manson’s The Long Hard Road Out of Hell, and ever since I’ve secretly wished I’d “accidentally” drop a book in the bath, thereby giving it “character.” But The Feminist Porn Book has a lot of character without my vain attempts. Its cover is splashed with the most exquisite neon orange and yellow, the huge text like a sledgehammer, and the decisive name declaring that yes, this is the one and only, the definitive feminist porn . . . read more

Review: Billy Castro Does the Mission

Review: Billy Castro Does the Mission

So Billy Castro, hottie extraordinaire of Bordello and Speakeasy, now has his own film. It’s called Billy Castro Does the Mission, for obvious reasons. In it, he wanders around the Mission having sex with any woman he can get his hands on. Four, in all. After a jack-off session on a weightlifting bench, Billy wanders out onto the street, where he finds Dylan Ryan stealing his bike. Obvious answer to this? Follow her and have frantic, slightly angry sex with her in a hot tub. I don’t care if this makes sense — it’s awesome. Billy’s attitude — something along the lines of “you stole my bike; I will cut you. Wait, you are incredibly hot… I will cut you . . . read more

Review: Speakeasy

Review: Speakeasy

It’s day three of Courtney Trouble week! Yesterday: Nostalgia. Tomorrow: Seven Minutes in Heaven and a chat with Courtney Trouble pt. 2. I had high hopes for Speakeasy, Courtney Trouble’s third film, because its premise is incredibly hot: a detective discovers an underground queer speakeasy where people do two things — fuck and fight. Mostly fuck. The costumes and music are reminiscent of the 1940s, and there is a loose storyline which doesn’t really matter. The score fits the film, bolstering its atmosphere rather than muddling it, which is a definite step up from the confusing musical selection of Roulette. There were many reasons I should’ve liked Speakeasy. For one, the music in each scene actually fades out when the action . . . read more

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